Pet Shops, Puppy Farms and Pounds

Background

Each year around 200,000 healthy companion animals are killed in pounds and shelters around Australia, while the demand for purpose-bred kittens, puppies and other animals continues to rise. This is because:

  • there is high demand for certain breeds
  • consumers want cute, baby animals like kittens and puppies, instead of adult animals
  • there is a lack of understanding about the conditions breeding animals face
  • people are not aware of the variety of breeds, temperaments and ages of animals looking to be re-homed in shelters.

Pounds and shelters see an influx of baby animals particularly in the weeks and months after Christmas. Animals are purchased on impulse and given as gifts, without consideration of the responsibilities that come with having a companion animal.

Shelters end up killing healthy animals due to lack of space and homes willing to take in abandoned animals.

A Solution

Animal Liberation Tasmania would like to see a transition to allow animals to only be adopted from shelters, rather than purchased as commodities from animal shops, puppy farms and backyard breeders.

Puppy farms and breeders should be outlawed. There is no necessity in the continual breeding cycle this industry perpetuates. Companion animal shops should be banned from selling animals, and shelters should adopt a no-kill policy.

De-sexing of companion animals should be mandatory to prevent unregulated over-breeding and selling, and to prevent the killing of healthy animals in shelters that cannot find homes.

How Can You Help

-do not purchase and animals from a companion animal shop, breeder, and online breeding operations. Sites such as Gumtree.com.au make it easy for the number of backyard breeding operations to grow.

-visit your local shelter or farm sanctuary to adopt your new family member. Encourage those in your life to do the same.

-lobby your state and federal MPs to introduce legislation that outlaws these practices

-encourage your local animal shelters to adopt a no-kill policy